Improving End-User Satisfaction with Help Desk Management Tools

Improving End-User Satisfaction with Help Desk Management Tools [45:01]

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Video Transcript

Hello everyone, this is Glenn Gray. I'm a Product Marketing Manager here at SolarWinds. I work with Dameware, Web Help Desk, and a couple of the products that we have here in the realm of Help Desk and Help Desk support tools. Today I'm going to talk about two of our products, Web Help Desk and Dameware, and I'm going to couch this in the context of how you can use these tools to ensure high end-user satisfaction. And we'll talk a little bit in just a moment here about why end-user satisfaction is such an important metric and how you can help improve it with these tools and also measure it.

 

So let's jump right in and have a look at the agenda. So, again, I'm going to talk a little bit about why we think end-user satisfaction is so important and how you can help manage user expectations and things like that with these two tools. Then we're going to talk about how you can manage the Help Desk with Web Help Desk, our ticket managing system. We're going to talk a little bit about what it is, how it works, how you can use it to keep your end-users happy and then we're going to give you just a brief product demo to show you some of the features that we think can help you reach that end goal of keeping your end-users happy. Then we're going to talk a little bit about how you support your end-users. And so, specifically, we're going to be talking about Dameware Remote Support and some of the tools that are included in it. I'll tell you a little bit about how it's put together, how it works. We'll talk about how you can use this tool and the set of the tools that comes with it to help keep your end-users happy. And then, of course, we'll also do a product demo.

 

So, briefly, let's just talk about why we think, here at SolarWinds, end-user satisfaction is such an important metric to be looking at and trying to improve over time. So let's just talk really quickly about why we here at SolarWinds think that end-user satisfaction is such an important metric to be looking at. Primarily we think that it is an indication of two really important things: First, it indicates just how effective your Help Desk team is at resolving tickets and this gives you an indication of how often tickets are being reopened and things like that. The second thing is that it gives you an indication of how quickly tickets are being resolved. So time to resolution on Help Desk tickets is important for a variety of reasons, but primarily the longer you have Help Desk tickets open, the more that this can end up costing your IT department. So end-user satisfaction is really a good indicator of both of these two sort of sub-metrics. And if you've got end-user satisfaction that is really high, you have a pretty good indication that you are resolving tickets effectively and you're resolving them quickly.

 

So let's jump in and talk a little bit about Web Help Desk. All right, so what is Web Help Desk? Well, as I mentioned earlier, it is an automated ticketing system that helps you manage all of your requests, IT support requests. It can also branch out a bit and help you manage requests for things like facilities, for HR, and things like that. But primarily we're going to be talking about this in the context of just IT requests.

 

It is a 100% web-based software, which means that it's run from a browser. So it's easy to use both on the client side, people reporting tickets, and it's also easy to use for your Help Desk agents that will be using it to track tickets and close tickets and things like that.

 

So now, let's talk about Web Help Desk a little bit. So Web Help Desk is a 100% web-based ticketing system and it can be used to track IT requests, but you can also branch out a little bit and use this program to track things like facilities requests and HR requests, as well.

 

Today, of course, we're going to be talking about it in the context of IT requests, but just know that you can use it for other purposes, as well. So as I said, it's a 100% web-based tool, which makes it really easy to use for both the people that will be reporting tickets or submitting tickets, so your end-users, and also on the other side for your Help Desk technicians and sysadmins that would be using this to sort of manage their ticket flows and resolve tickets, as well.

 

One of the great features in Web Help Desk is that it integrates with Orion to take Orion alerts straight to ticket automation, and I'm going to talk about that a little bit in more detail just a little while here and show you how that works. It also has a great dashboard for performance reporting, so this gives you and id-- This is really good for tracking, as I was saying earlier, end-user satisfaction. It lets you track certain metrics to, you know, ensure that tickets are being resolved quickly. It'll let you look at your overall tickets that are open, the ones that have been closed, and things like that. So it gives you a bunch of great metrics that can really give you a great indicator of just how well your Help Desk team is performing.

 

So what platforms is this supported on? Well, it's supported on pretty much all the major operating systems. So that is to say that it can run in a Windows environment, a Mac OS environment, or a Linux environment. We also have a virtual machine that can be spun up in either the VMware or vSphere - oh, I'm sorry, VMware or Hyper-V. And this is really great for those of you who don't already have the software that perhaps want to eval the software. I'm going to show you in a minute that we've also got available to you on the Web Help Desk website a great demo that really, that can be used just like a typical installation. But if you want to spin this up in your environment and you want to do that really quickly, you can do that with this virtual machine image that we've got where it's already installed and more or less configured and ready to go. So you would have to just go in and kind of tailor a little bit to your own system, but it would sort of obviate the need for having to go in and set the system up yourself. So it's an automated ticketing system, so you can have emails so people can submit tickets through an email - so simply email the Help Desk and it will create a ticket.

 

As I mentioned earlier, Orion alerts straight to tickets, as well. In V12, the latest release of Web Help Desk, we've also got asset discovery and some integration there that I think is really great. So this is like a tool that allows you to go out and discover all the assets on your network and then create detailed asset reports that will allow you to sort of like manage all of your assets, hardware and software.

 

Then it also has some great remote control integrations, including integration with Dameware, which we're also going to be talking about in just a little while. One of the other great things that we think about this program is that is has both knowledge based and FAQ-type things that you can deploy. So this is really great for end-user self-service, frequently asked questions, and things like that - and you can deploy those both internally for you techs and externally for your end-users.

 

With respect to communication, and communication we think is another really key thing to ensuring end-user satisfaction: you can have bidirectional email correspondence from right within the ticketing system, you can exchange notes with the end-user, then you can also have setup email alerts and SMS alerts. So these would be based on SLAs or other types of rules or functions that you want to setup. But these are simply things that you can say, "Oh, this ticket is 12 hours overdue" and then it might actually escalate the ticket and send out an SMS alert to the new tech that has been assigned to it.

 

So, how exactly does Web Help Desk help keep your end-users happy? So as I said, there's really kind of two sides to Web Help Desk: there's the side that the end-users are going to see, the interface for that, and I'm going to show you what that looks like in just a moment. And then there's the other side of it, and this is the side, the interface, that your IT pros, Help Desk agents, would be using to sort of resolve tickets and track tickets through.

 

As I said earlier, it is an intuitive web-based interface. It's really simple to use for the end-users. You can also, you can set it up such that they don't even have to go in and use the web-based interface, they can simply just email a ticket to the Help Desk and it will create a ticket on their behalf. It's great for quick ticket resolutions. As I said earlier, two-way communications, and then we also talked about a little bit, FAQs and knowledge bases. And I'm going to show you what those look like in just a moment.

 

And then there's a great feedback mechanism built into this in the way of customer survey. So you can set this up such that it will generate customer surveys just as soon as the ticket is closed and this will really help you and go a long way towards tracking end-user satisfaction.

 

On the other side of things, for IT pros, there's a lot of automation that can be built into this. So, for example, if you have sort of a frequently asked thing that comes up, you can automate this such that it goes to a specific tech or something along those lines. So we also have asset discovery and management, which I talked about a little bit earlier and I'm going to show you what that looks like in just a moment. Then we've also got integration with some great SolarWinds tools and also some third-party applications – so, SolarWinds Orion alerts. So for those of you out there that own Network Performance Monitor or Server & Application Monitor, it's great for integration with that. It also integrates with Dameware, as I said earlier. And then we also have some integration with some third-party tools in case you want to use a third party asset discovery mechanism.

 

SLA alerts and notifications, this is great for helping keep your Help Desk techs focused and on track. And then there's also a mobile application that is included for free with every Web Help Desk license purchase. I'm not going to show you what that looks like today, but you can have a look at that on webhelpdesk.com.

 

So let's have a look at the product demo. So I'm going to show you what we can do, what Web Help Desk can do in terms of creating escalation rules. I'm going to show you what the FAQ looks like for both the techs and end-users. And then I'm going to talk about using reporting and the dashboard to track performance. And then we'll talk briefly about the surveys and how you can deploy those from Web Help Desk.

 

Okay so what I've done here is I've opened up a web browser and I'm just going to webhelpdesk.com. And for those of you who don't already have Web Help Desk, I would encourage you to go here to check out the demo. So on this webpage you can see we have a demo menu here and under that, we've got an opportunity to look at both the tech side of the interface and also the client side. So the client demo is what the end-users would see if this is deployed in your environment.

 

So we're going to go ahead and open up the tech demo. And here we are. So this is what it looks like and since we're talking about escalation rules, I'm going to go over here to the setup and go over here to Processes and you can see that we've got a section called Action Rules. So if you'll open up Action Rules here, so we've already got one that's built out. So we'll just go ahead and have a look at this, but you could create a new one right over here. So this one's called CEO's Ticket - Bump. Probably not an uncommon thing. So you can set a priority, obviously give it a name. And then what you're going to do, just like I said, just like for creating an Outlook Rule or something like that, you're going to setup a bunch of criteria that will allow you to migrate this ticket through the system as you see fit depending on what the criteria is that you set.

 

So in this one, you can see that they've got it set right now so the client email is equal to this person's email address. In other words, if this is coming from the CEO, then we can have it do a variety of actions. And right here it looks like what they're going to do is they're going to have this escalated up to the IT Director and then assign this, also, to a specific tech. So, again, probably not an uncommon thing to see in a Help Desk environment where if you get someone from the C-Suite creating a Help Desk ticket then it's going to get escalated so that it gets resolved as quickly as possible. So, as you can see, I'm just going to go back over to the criteria, you can see that you've got quite a bit that you can choose from here to actually setup your rule. And then within the action side of things, you can see that you've also got quite a bit that you can change here. So again, Action Rules in the context of escalating tickets, they can be setup on a variety of things.

 

So, for example, if you wanted to you could setup something that says if this ticket is eight hours old and it hasn't been touched by someone, then we escalate it up to another tech or we send a request or we send an email out to the IT Director to let them know that we've got tickets that are falling behind. So these are really great for making sure that you're meeting your SLAs, whether they're internal or external, depending on who you're servicing.

 

Okay so let's have a look really quickly at the FAQs. And this is, again, we're looking right now at the tech demo, so this is what your Help Desk agents would see. So FAQs, first off, this probably goes without saying, but FAQs are really great for self-service. And this is an especially nice setup because you can bunch these or categorize these based on specific types of requests.

 

So, for example here, under categories we've got emails, as I mentioned earlier you can use this for HR requests, legal department requests, facility requests, and things like that. So you can set this up such that when the end-user goes in and selects their category, it'll show them a bunch of frequently asked questions specific to that category. And I'm going to show you what that looks like in just a moment from the end-user side. But at any rate, as you can see, you can go in and create, you can go in and create custom FAQs here. You can set this such that they're internal to the tech or you can have these client-facing to help end-users kind of resolve tickets on their own, and this will cut down on some of the clutter and some of the noise that you might get with respect to easy Help Desk tickets.

 

Okay, so we're just going to have a look really quickly here at some of the ones that we've got created. And you can see that, "How do I configure my wireless settings?" Really simple one, something that certainly should be an FAQ, something that can really bog down your Help Desk, though, with really simple requests like that. So this is really great for making sure that clients are able to do a lot of the easy things themselves and taking a load off of your techs and letting them sort of focus on the issues that are really important.

 

So let's have a look at what it looks like from the client side of things. So I'm just going to go to the client demo here. You can just launch it right from the tech demo. All right so this is what the initial interface looks like for the client side of things. And you can see this is a pretty simple interface. And it's setup such that it's pretty easy to get around, get around in for the end-user. So you can, again, comparing it to the tech demo, the tech demo's going to look a little bit more complicated than this but really, we want to make this just as simple as possible for the end-user to navigate.

 

So if they wanted to go in and create a Help Desk ticket, they simply would just chose their request. But, as we were talking about earlier, with respect to FAQs, we'll just click over here really quickly. We will choose a category, and then you can see a whole bunch of stuff pops up right here. So this lets the end-user just kind of help themselves here without having to, without having to create a ticket for something that's fairly simple to do.

 

And also here when they're creating the request, once they've chosen their category it's going to show them related FAQs over here on the right hand side. So they don't even really have to go to the FAQs. I mean, this is something that, like, you would like to assume, I think, that most end-users are probably going to jump over and have a look at the FAQs themselves, but most likely, they're just going to go ahead and create a ticket. So this is a really nice feature here because once they've selected whatever it is that they, whatever category that they're submitting a ticket for, then as I said a set of related FAQs will pop up right over here on the right hand side. And the hope is that they read through these and take care of some of the easy problems themselves.

 

And I'm going to go over here to the reporting section just to give you an idea really quickly of what the, what the reporting section looks like and what the dashboard section looks like here. So you can go in and create a variety of reports. And, as you can see, there are several that have been created already here in the demo. So you can click around in these and have a look at some of these yourself, or you can go in on the online demo and create a new report. And I believe that this gets updated daily.

 

So, again, for example - first call resolution - we talked about that a little bit earlier. This is what the internal report looks like, or what it looks like, the creation side of things here. So this would give you an indication of how often tickets are being resolved sort of on that first call and not being reopened. So, again, this is something that we really think is important to end-user satisfaction is making sure that the ticket is resolved the first time and not having to be reopened. So once you're in here you can go ahead and run the report. And then it will give you just a quick overview of what things looks like so far. So you've got a nice graph here and then you've also got some counts of the tickets. Average open time this month. Same thing, I'm going to run the report. It looks like this one is broken down by Help Desk agent. So it gives you a really good indication of how each individual agent is performing. And then, again, we also have the data that it's pulling these graphs from.

 

You can also have these reports scheduled to run. We don't have anything setup in here, but you can run these reports daily, weekly, monthly, things like that. So you can schedule the report so they'll automatically run. And this little section over here, survey results, we're going to talk about that in just a second. In fact, why don't we just jump into that now.

 

So I'm going to go back over here to the setup because I want to talk about CSI surveys that you can generate automatically here. So I'm just going to go down to the Surveys section. And here's a really simple one. This would be one, perhaps, that you send out that's at the end of, or any time a ticket is closed. So how did we do? So let's have a look at it. And it gives you an opportunity to go ahead and fill in some of the description here, the greeting, the thank you message that they get, and then it allows you to go ahead and customize this with additional questions if you want to - so just like a typical survey. Once you've got this setup, you've got it automated to go out at the end of every single ticket resolution, then you can head over here to Reports again, go to Survey Results, and then you can go ahead and pull up your survey results. Let’s take this back a little bit… maybe not that far… Right there. And we'll select a handful of agents here. Let's run the report and see what we come up with. And now you get a set of survey results here that gives you an indication, it looks like maybe we chose some techs that didn't have any responses. At any rate, you can go in here and chose the techs and then it will give you the survey results and give you a really good indication of how each individual tech is performing, how you're performing as an entire department, or you can even have tech groups as you see over here. I'm not sure that we've got tech groups setup. Yes we do. So like hardware support, desktop support, things like that. You might group these more logically by role type, so for example, Help Desk support systems administration, network administration, things along those lines.

 

So, again, back to this idea of maintaining and improving end-user satisfaction. This mechanism here for gathering information, this survey mechanism, really give you a good idea of how well each of your individual techs are doing, how your group is doing, and things like that. So, as you can see, Web Help Desk is a pretty useful tool for helping to make sure that you're maintaining end-user satisfaction. And, again, we think this is a really important metric to be looking at overall because it gives you an indication of just overall performance in general.

 

All right so now we're going to talk about how you can support your end-users with Dameware Remote Support. So, Dameware Remote Support is a comprehensive remote administration tool; it includes remote control. So this would be, so there are two products in the Dameware lineup. One is Mini Remote Control and one is Dameware Remote Support. Mini Remote Control, or MRC, is the remote control tool. Dameware Remote Support is a more comprehensive tool that includes MRC, but it also includes some remote administration features that I'll talk about in just a second.

 

So the remote control piece, the MRC that is included in Remote Support, is a proprietary remote control protocol for Windows that Dameware created. And it's better than an RDP session for a variety of reasons, and I'm going to demonstrate it in just a little while and show you what it looks like and why we think it's better than a basic RDP connection. It includes in-session chat and one-click screenshots. In addition to that, we also have support for Mac OS X and Linux through the built-in VNC client that’s installed in the MRC interface. And then we also have support for Intel AMT KVM. I'm going to show you how this works in just a moment. This is a really great feature for supporting servers.

 

So Dameware Remote Support is one of the two products that's included in the Dameware line up. We have our entry-level product, which is called Mini Remote Control, or MRC, and then the more comprehensive tool, which is called Dameware Remote Support, or DRS.

 

So what's the difference between the two? Well MRC is a remote control tool. So this is kind of like RDP, VNC, for those of you who are familiar with that. And we're going to talk about why we think it's better than a lot of those tools in just a moment. But Dameware Remote Support, the more comprehensive tool, actually includes MRC. So every copy of DRS that you buy includes a copy of MRC. But it also includes some remote administration tools that'll allow you to support your environment and sort of augment the remote control tools and give you some features that we think sysadmins, help desk pros use on a daily basis anyway.

 

So let's talk really quickly about the remote control piece. So included in MRC is a proprietary remote control protocol for Windows. And, as I said earlier, I'm going to give you a demo in just a moment and show you why we think this is a better way to make remote control connections, especially with respect to supporting end-users, than perhaps an RDP or a VNC session. So included in that is an in-session chat that allows you to communicate with the end-users while you are, while you're having a remote control session with them. You can also take one-click screenshots to try to get a good indication of what you're seeing on the screen, record it, perhaps pass it around to other sysadmins to see if they've seen a similar problem. In addition to that, we've also got a built-in VNC client to make Mac OS X and Linux connections right from the same console. So this is really great for those of you who have mixed operating system environments. So people with Windows, people with Macs, and Linux computers all on the same network, this allows you to support them all right from the same console. And I'm going to give you a demonstration of that in just a moment, too.

 

Then we've also got built-in support for the Intel AMT KVM features. And this allows you to make remote control connections to computers that have support for vPro. And this is really great for those of you who would need to mount an ISO to remotely install an operating system or perhaps get into the BIOS to CMOS settings on a remote computer without having to actually walk up and be physically at the keyboard. And, again, I'm going to give you a demo of that in just a moment.

 

And then we've also got included in Dameware Remote Support, Dameware Mobile for iOS and coming soon for Android devices, as well. And what this is is a tool that allows you to remotely control Windows computers from your iOS or Android device. So it's great for those of you who have on-call rotations. I'm not going to be giving a demo of this right now, but we've got another webcast coming up shortly for our remote IT support tools. We're going to be talking about Mobile Admin. We're also going to be talking about Dameware Mobile so I'd encourage you to get on that one if you're interested in learning about how you can support your environments, both your networks and your computers, from iPads and other tablet devices or even smartphones.

 

So, in addition to that, Dameware Remote Support also includes a set of remote administration tools. So included in this is the Windows administration piece, and this basically allows you to troubleshoot Windows computers without having to make a remote control session. So, for example, managing services and processes on remote computers, viewing and clearing event logs, managing disc shares, peripherals, and things like that. I'm going to show you what that looks like in just a moment. Then we've also got Intel vPro support and Wake-On-LAN support for sleeping or crashed computers. This will allow you to actually restart a computer that is in a crashed mode, allow you to wake sleeping computers to provide support to them when users are away from their desks. Then we've also got a great set of Active Directory management tools here that allows the sysadmins or Help Desk pros using Dameware Remote Support to also manipulate Active Directory objects - simple things like going in and resetting password, unlocking accounts, and things like that - or something that's even perhaps a little more complicated like going in and editing specific group policies.

 

So, how does DRS help keep your end-users happy? So from the end-user side of things, it's a quick resolution, they get to actually watch the solution - this is one of the benefits over a standard RDP session. You are actually sharing the end-users screen with them, so it's great for teaching them how to do specific things. A lot of the Help Desk requests that people get are really more training requests than they are IT requests. So, often Help Desk agents are having to show end-users how to do things in email, work with specific documents or work with specific applications, and things like that. So it's really great for training the end-users, kind of teaching them to help themselves. As I said earlier, there's a great communication tool built into this that allows you to chat during a remote control session with the end-user so you can really get a good indication of what's going on. You can also lock them out of the keyboard or let them have control of the keyboard and mouse so they can reproduce the problem they were having and show you while you're online. And, again, that on-screen chat is really great for just talking through a problem with them.

 

You can also do some invisible troubleshooting. And this goes back to the Windows administration tools that I was talking about just a moment ago. This would allow you to go in and troubleshoot an end-user’s computer without them even knowing that you're doing it because you don't have to do it through a remote control session. And then we've also got support for crashed hardware with the Intel vPro support.

 

On the IT pros side of things, it's a super easy software to deploy. It has a really small footprint. You can download this, get it installed, up and running, having discovered some of the computers on your network, your Active Directory, and start supporting end-users really in just a matter of minutes. You don't have to go in and customize the interface or anything like that. I'll show you what it looks like in just a moment, but it's a basic MMC (Microsoft Management Console) interface so it's super easy to use. If anybody's ever used Active Directory tools that come out of the box with Windows server, then you know exactly what you're looking at as soon as you open up Dameware Remote Support.

 

For the MRC connections, it requires an agent that needs to be installed on the end-users computers. These agents are customizable. You can go in and create a set of agents for specific groups. So you could have a set of agents that you would deploy to your C-Suite: CEOs, CMOs, and people like that that might require permission for your Help Desk to connect. And you could have a different set of agents that you customize and deploy to, you know, people that are just your standard end-users in an environment. And that's a really easy thing to do, it's a super easy tool, and it comes with every DRS installation.

 

And then, of course, remote troubleshooting, sort of this idea of centralizing your troubleshooting rather than having to go from desk to desk. This isn't anything new, but this is something that's been saving Help Desks money for a long time.

 

And as I mentioned earlier, we also have support for a mixed OS environment, so you can support Mac, Linux, and Windows computers right from the same console. And then we've also got the mobility of Dameware Mobile that's great, again, for situations where you have an on-call rotation and your Help Desk needs to be prepared to provide support while they're out and about. So this allows them to make remote connections from an iPad, iPhone, and coming soon, from an Android device, as well.

 

So we're going to jump in and do a product demo of Dameware Remote Support really quickly. We're going to talk about remote control piece, that's probably the most important piece so we're going to show you how we can make a connection to a Windows computer. We're going to make a connection to a Mac OS X computer. And then I'm going to demonstrate what the Intel AMT KVM remote control feature looks. We'll show you really briefly what the remote administration piece looks like, and then we're going to jump in and just briefly show you what the Active Directory management tools look like, as well.

 

Okay so this is what the DRS console looks like. And, as I said earlier, it's built on an MMC platform so you can see that it looks a lot like what you would see if you just opened up your Active Directory tools, you know, straight out of the box from Windows server. So it's pretty easy to get around in. You can setup a set of favorite machines over here, machines that you often connect to. But what I'm going to go ahead and do is I'm just going to go ahead and kick off our remote control session. So I can open MRC right from here so, for example, on this computer I would just go down to where it says Remote Control, right click on it, choose Mini Remote Control, and that'll open up. I've already got that open so I'm just going to pull that up real quick. And so when your MRC pops open, this is what it looks like. I'm going to go ahead and hit the Connect button here. And then, again, I've got a Saved Host List here, just some computers that I like to connect to. And of course, I've got the ones here that we're going to be demoing today.

 

So let's go ahead and start with this one and what we're going to show now is an MRC connection. So an MRC connection is--this is the Dameware proprietary remote control protocol that I talked about earlier that gives you a lot more flexibility than just a simple RDP connection. You can also launch an RDP session right from here, as well. So if you, for whatever reason, you can't make a connection to an MRC computer, if an agent hasn't been deployed on it, then you can simply make that connection through an RDP right here if you want to.

 

And real briefly, just want to talk quickly about the agent deployment too. You can deploy your agents one of two ways. One you can, well, actually, one of three ways, you can deploy it through a third-party sort of software that allows you to kind of like deploy, like a deployment piece of software, right? So like a patch type of software. You can also deploy it through Group Policy and that's what most people elect to do. And for those of you with smaller environments, you can actually deploy the agent upon first connection. So the first time you make a connection to an end-user's computer via MRC, it's going to pop up and say, "Hey, the agent isn't installed on this computer, would you like to install it now?" You chose yes, it dumps it really quickly onto the end-user's computer and then you're allowed to go ahead and make that connection. So it's pretty simple to go ahead and deploy this. Like I said, you can do it one of three ways. I've already got an agent deployed on this computer.

 

We're looking at Dameware Remote Support version 10. The computer that I'm going to be making connection to has Dameware Remote Support Agent V9 on there. So we've got backward compatibility for older agents. So if you've got V10 you can make a connection to a computer with a V8 or a V9 agent installed on it. So I've already got my credentials in here. And I've chosen the Windows, encrypted Windows log on to make a connection here. We've also got smart card log-ons for those of you who've got smart card authentication requirements. So we're going to go ahead and make the connection now. And here we are.

 

So, as I said earlier, this computer that I'm making a connection to has a version 9 agent on it, and as you can see it pops up right off the bat and says, "Hey, this has got an older version of Dameware MRC agent on it, would you like to go ahead and upgrade it right now?" So we've got the option to go ahead and upgrade this, or I can say, "Don't ask me about this anymore," and just hit no. For this demonstration, I'm just going to go ahead and hit no on this. And now I have made a remote connection to the end-user's computer here.

 

And just really quickly one of the things that I'm looking at here, this is a free tool that we offer on dameware.com. It's a free Dameware SSH client for Windows. And, really, what it is is just your basic, your standard SSH client. It's a lot like PuTTY or something like that, but one of the great things about it is that it has a tabbed interface, much like a browser. So you can have several SSH or Telnet sessions going at one time. So I encourage you to download that and try that out if you want to.

 

So from here I can kick off, I can kick off a chat session. I can do a remote file transfer from this computer to the one that I'm working on. I can take one-click screenshots. I can lock the end-user out of their keyboard and mouse. I can send hotkey commands like a control+alt+delete to it. You know, I can work with the end-user's printers. I can print off what I'm looking at, things like that. So it's a pretty handy way of doing this. And as I said earlier, it gives you an opportunity to really show the end-user what's going on. So right now, the end-user on this computer is able to see exactly what I'm doing. So it's not like an RDP session that actually locks them out, this gives you the opportunity to share the end-users screen. It's great for training and things like that. So that is what an MRC connection looks like.

 

So I'm going to go ahead and make a disconnection here. It's going to take us back to our MRC window. Going to hit our Connect button. Then I'm back to my screen where I've got my Saved Host List. And what I'm going to do now is I'm going to choose a Mac computer to make a connection to. And so now, what I've done is I've chosen VNC Viewer to make a connection to either a Linux or a Mac machine. So you've got to make sure that VNC is up and running on your end-user's computer before you make a connection to it. But all modern Mac OS X installations come with a VNC server on their end. So let's go ahead and just make a real quick connection to this computer. And so now we're remotely controlling a Mac OS X computer right from the same console, as well.

 

I'm not going to demo a Linux computer, but it's exactly the same thing that we've just done here and we're just going to make a connection through that VNC Viewer that's built into the MRC console. So I'll go ahead and disconnect here. Hit our Connect button to bring up our list again.

 

And let's have a look at the Intel AMT KVM connection. So what I've done is I've chosen Intel AMT KVM down here and it automatically defaults to the Intel AMT Digest authentication. I'm going to put in my creds, make a connection to the computer now. Okay so now we're looking at, it looks like a Windows 7 Pro computer with Intel vPro support. Let's see if I can remember, I'm going to send the control+alt+delete real quick. And now we are connected here.

 

And what I can do now, just to demo this for you really quickly, I'm going to go ahead and restart this end-user's computer. And you can actually watch the boot cycle. So this is great, again, if you need to get into the CMOS or something like that. This is really just like if you were operating this computer via a KVM, a standard physical KVM. And as you can see, we are now watching the boot cycle here. And then it kicks off to Windows, this is a VM we're connected to so obviously it's booting really quickly. But that gives you, like I said, it gives you an opportunity to manipulate the boot sequence if you need to, have it boot from a CD, have it book from an ISO. So this is really great if you're installing an operating system or something along those lines of a remote computer that you don't want to physically have to go to. I'm going to go ahead and disconnect from that.

 

And I'm just going to go ahead and close out the MRC console now and then we're going to talk a little bit about some of the remote administration and Active Directory features also built into the DRS console. So now we're looking at the DRS console again, and again I've got a list of favorite computers here over on this side. So for example on this computer here, as you can see, I can look at the disk drives. So I've chosen this feature, so I'm looking at the drives attached to it. So I can do that, I can look at the Event Log of the computer; I can look at local users and groups on this computer. If this computer has support for Intel AMT through vPro, I can also restart it from here if it's in a crash state. Or I can wake if it's asleep.

 

I've also got, speaking of Wake-On-LAN, I've got that down here too. So send it a magic packet, wake it up from a sleep and then remotely support it from here without the end-user's having to be there. I can look at other peripherals like the Printers that are attached to this device. I can look at the Processes, the Properties of the end-user's computer. I can look at all the Services they're running on the end-user's computer; I can send it a remote shut down. I can look at the installed software on it. I can look at a set of System Tools - so this would be our Performance Monitor, Registry Editor, and things like that. So this is what the remote administration piece looks like and, as I said earlier, this gives you an opportunity to really kind of troubleshoot the end-user's computer without them even knowing that you're doing it. So if they've got a runaway process, or if they've got a service that needs to be started, or one that needs to be stopped, you can do that from right here.

 

So, as I mentioned earlier, we also have support for multiple Active Directory installations. And what we're looking at here is an Active Directory installation here. Wisely, the IT department here at SolarWinds has not given me domain admin privileges so I can't really do too much damage here, but you can see that I can get a list of the Active Directory Computers, Active Directory Users. And this is really great because Help Desk agents are often tasked with things like unlocking user accounts, resetting passwords and things like that, and they can do it right here from the DRS console. So if you think about it, the DRS console really is kind of a one, the one spot where they can perform most of their daily tasks. So for those of you that work in sort of the Help Desk role or even a sysadmin role, this allows you to make connections to remote user's computers from one spot, it allows you to work in Active Directory from one spot, and then it also allows you to remotely troubleshoot computers without making a remote connection right from the same spot, as well.

 

So it's a pretty handy tool and, like I said, it's just great for sysadmins that don't want to have a whole bunch of windows open and be alt tabbing all day long through all of their stuff. So speaking of alt tabbing, let's alt tab back over to our presentation. Here we go.

 

And that is all we've got for today so I want to thank you for joining, and as I said earlier, we're going to have another webinar that will include Dameware Mobile and Mobile Admin. I encourage you to listen to that. It's a great compliment to what we've talked about here today because it gives you an opportunity to look at some of the tools that we have that will allow you to support your environment from anywhere as long as you've got a mobile device. So thanks again for joining us and we're going to stay on the line here if you've got any questions then fire away and the Product Manager and I will be here to answer your questions, so thanks a lot.


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